Finding a cure for asbestosis
Lung Disease

Finding a cure for asbestosis

Nearly 10% of all cancer cases diagnosed in Australia are lung cancer. While some of these are due to smoking and air pollutants, many lung cancer cases are either genetic, or caused by the building material asbestos. In fact, Australia has one of the highest rates of mesothelioma (the type of tumour caused by asbestos) in the world and unfortunately currently there is no cure.

In order to try find effective treatments for this terrible disease the first step of the project is carrying out ‘genome sequencing’ on patient lung cell samples. This is hoping to identify potential gene alterations – the ‘driver’ genes that cause mutations in the lung and lead to the development of mesothelioma and associated malignant tumours. This will help to answer, if there is a particular type of genetic change due to asbestos exposure and if this knowledge can be used to develop an early predictive test for mesothelioma.

The information gained will lead to part two of the project; personalising lung cancer treatments for patients based off their genetics. We know that treatment for any type of lung cancer is just that, a treatment to keep the symptoms and side effects of the disease at bay. Unfortunately, there is currently no “cure”, but Professor Rayleen Bowman’s team hope to change this by developing a new method that will allow for highly personalised treatment based on the results of gained in early testing.

This research is an exciting step forward in looking for a treatment and cure for this terrible yet all too common condition.

Support The Common Good here.

Published: June 11, 2019

Related news & events

Mother-of-four shares story of transplant journey

Patient Stories

Mother-of-four shares story of transplant journey

A Queensland mother who was diagnosed with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Chronic Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis and later received a lung transplant, shares her story here.

Find out more

The journey from the Cycle of Giving to the Tour de Brisbane

The Common Good

The journey from the Cycle of Giving to the Tour de Brisbane

In 2006, Mary and Mal Long started an event called Cycle of Giving to show their gratitude to Mal’s donor family and medical team.

Find out more

Chain Reaction Challenge 2024: Helping Kids visiting The Prince Charles Hospital

The Common Good

Chain Reaction Challenge 2024: Helping Kids visiting The Prince Charles Hospital

In March, dozens of cyclists from Brisbane will take part in a 1000 km cycle in and around Adelaide for the Chain Reaction Challenge 2024.

Find out more

30-year-old heart transplant recipient’s journey to the 2024 Tour de Brisbane

Heart Disease

30-year-old heart transplant recipient’s journey to the 2024 Tour de Brisbane

A Perth father who received a heart transplant three years ago is preparing to take part in the 2024 Tour de Brisbane. Read more about his journey and support his ride here.

Find out more

International Day of Women and Girls in Science 2024

The Common Good

International Day of Women and Girls in Science 2024

This February, we acknowledge International Day of Women and Girls in Science 2024 and some of the remarkable women who are making a difference in STEM.

Find out more

Marfan and Aortopathy Conference Brisbane 2024

The Common Good

Marfan and Aortopathy Conference Brisbane 2024

The Marfan and Aortopathy Conference Brisbane 2024 is on Saturday, April 20, at The Prince Charles Hospital. Click here for more details.

Find out more

What is Marfan Syndrome?

The Common Good

What is Marfan Syndrome?

What is Marfan Syndrome? It affects about 1 in 5000 people across the globe, and for some, it can lead to serious or even life-threatening complications. Learn more here.

Find out more

The Café for The Common Good finds new home at Caboolture Hospital

Social Enterprise

The Café for The Common Good finds new home at Caboolture Hospital

Caboolture Hospital Café: In exciting news, our café has a new home in the hospital’s recently opened Clinical Services Building.

Find out more

Take a walk down Memory Lane at The Prince Charles Hospital

Ageing

Take a walk down Memory Lane at The Prince Charles Hospital

At The Prince Charles Hospital, patients and their families are encouraged to take a trip down the newly completed ‘Memory Lane’. Read about the impactful project here.

Find out more