Take a walk down Memory Lane at The Prince Charles Hospital
Ageing

Take a walk down Memory Lane at The Prince Charles Hospital

On the first floor of The Prince Charles Hospital, patients and their families can now take a stroll down the newly completed ‘Memory Lane’. This hospital hallway was recently adorned with images from yesteryear, transforming it into a sought-after walking destination.

This particular corridor leads to Wards EMU, 1F and 1G/GEM Ward, where older adults are cared for, and its revamp is set to benefit many who are admitted here. For many patients, staying active and maintaining their strength and balance can be difficult while they are in hospital. Importantly, Memory Lane gives these patients a reason to get out of bed and move and offers something to engage with cognitively.

While the upgraded hallway is now a drawcard for hospital patients, visitors and staff, its transformation is only possible because several parties came together for the common good, including the compassionate hospital staff from Internal Medicine Services, the team at The Prince Charles Hospital Foundation, and last but certainly not least, the incredible people who supported the project during Giving Day in 2022.

Keep reading as we share more on the benefits of Memory Lane and how this impactful project became a reality.

About The Prince Charles Hospital’s Memory Lane

Bed rest and sedentary behaviour exacerbate functional decline, and in older hospital patients, this lack of physical activity can lead to a significant drop in independence.

“We know that lying in a hospital bed and losing condition (deconditioning) is associated with depression and demoralisation. And that’s completely understandable – any one of us would feel like that,” said Dr Lucy Dakin, the Director of Geriatrics and Subacute Services at The Prince Charles Hospital.

Some frail older patients who’ve experienced hospital-associated deconditioning may even need to be discharged into an aged care facility – which can be a devastating reality for many who crave the comfort and familiarity of their own home.

Memory Lane was inspired by a similar memory corridor overseas after a nurse practitioner shared the idea. Plus, it utilises the concepts of the multi-disciplinary Eat Walk Engage Program to enhance care and promote faster recovery of older hospital patients.

“We want to encourage people to mobilise (in the hospital)– so how do you encourage people to mobilise? You get them a task to do. Go and walk down this memory lane, have a look at old pictures of Prince Charles, old pictures of Brisbane that will stimulate their memory but also get them walking and stimulate their mobility as well,” said Jeff Rowland, Director of Internal Medicine, at The Prince Charles Hospital.

 

Patient and clinicians looking at photos in Memory Lane
Dr Lucy Dakin and Kevin Clark with patient Eileen.

Images selected for the impactful corridor

Among the carefully selected photos that showcase the rich history of Brisbane and The Prince Charles Hospital, you will find imagery of the 1982 Commonwealth Games and its mascot Matilda, Royal visits of Queen Elizabeth 2 in 1954, and Prince Charles in 1994 to The Prince Charles Hospital.

There is also a range of pictures of local landmarks under construction, like Houghton Highway, Lang Park (now more commonly known as Suncorp Stadium) and the Story Bridge.

The suburbs surrounding the hospital are another focal point, with pictures showing the old tram line on Gympie Road and Chermside’s shopping precinct in 1972.

 

Memory Lane
A selection of photos in Memory Lane.

Benefits of Memory Lane

Hospital staff say Memory Lane supports patients’ functional, emotional, physiological, and behavioural well-being.

Here are some of the top benefits:

  1. Evokes feelings of nostalgia

If reminiscing by looking at old photos boosts your mood, you’re not alone.

The memories evoked can take us back to happy days, and talking about and remembering those moments with others can also strengthen bonds and enhance social connection.

“The Internal Medicine Program hopes the Memory Lane will support patients’ experience nostalgia and reminiscing given this provides a connection between our past and present selves, and we know this can be calming and reduce stress, along with providing a physiological and emotional response, consistent with feeling safe,” said Kevin Clark, Nursing Director of Internal Medicine Services at The Prince Charles Hospital.

  1. Encourages mobility

As discussed previously, older patients are at greater risk of functional decline, as hospital-associated deconditioning tends to happen at a faster rate for them.

That is why activities or places encouraging and supporting mobility are vital in a hospital setting.

“As we get older, we lose muscle very quickly when we become stationary. So, lying in bed just for a few days, older people can lose a lot of muscle – and that muscle is very important for walking and independence,” said Dr Lucy Dakin, the Director of Geriatrics and Subacute Services at The Prince Charles Hospital.

“We know that older people who are lying in bed often can’t regain their independence and face a lot of obstacles to their recovery,” Dr Dakin added. “Giving them motivation and a reason to get out of bed helps them to improve that independence, so anything that we can do in the hospital environment to contribute to that is really valuable.”

Thank you for supporting Memory Lane

Projects like Memory Lane are only achievable when incredible supporters like you back them.

Thank you to everyone who donated to make this project and others a reality.

If you wish to make a difference in hospital patient care or give time to the dedicated researchers we support who are working towards life-changing medical breakthroughs, click here.

Published: January 11, 2024

Related news & events

The journey from the Cycle of Giving to the Tour de Brisbane

The Common Good

The journey from the Cycle of Giving to the Tour de Brisbane

In 2006, Mary and Mal Long started an event called Cycle of Giving to show their gratitude to Mal’s donor family and medical team.

Find out more

Chain Reaction Challenge 2024: Helping Kids visiting The Prince Charles Hospital

The Common Good

Chain Reaction Challenge 2024: Helping Kids visiting The Prince Charles Hospital

In March, dozens of cyclists from Brisbane will take part in a 1000 km cycle in and around Adelaide for the Chain Reaction Challenge 2024.

Find out more

30-year-old heart transplant recipient’s journey to the 2024 Tour de Brisbane

Heart Disease

30-year-old heart transplant recipient’s journey to the 2024 Tour de Brisbane

A Perth father who received a heart transplant three years ago is preparing to take part in the 2024 Tour de Brisbane. Read more about his journey and support his ride here.

Find out more

International Day of Women and Girls in Science 2024

The Common Good

International Day of Women and Girls in Science 2024

This February, we acknowledge International Day of Women and Girls in Science 2024 and some of the remarkable women who are making a difference in STEM.

Find out more

Marfan and Aortopathy Conference Brisbane 2024

The Common Good

Marfan and Aortopathy Conference Brisbane 2024

The Marfan and Aortopathy Conference Brisbane 2024 is on Saturday, April 20, at The Prince Charles Hospital. Click here for more details.

Find out more

What is Marfan Syndrome?

The Common Good

What is Marfan Syndrome?

What is Marfan Syndrome? It affects about 1 in 5000 people across the globe, and for some, it can lead to serious or even life-threatening complications. Learn more here.

Find out more

The Café for The Common Good finds new home at Caboolture Hospital

Social Enterprise

The Café for The Common Good finds new home at Caboolture Hospital

Caboolture Hospital Café: In exciting news, our café has a new home in the hospital’s recently opened Clinical Services Building.

Find out more

Take a walk down Memory Lane at The Prince Charles Hospital

Ageing

Take a walk down Memory Lane at The Prince Charles Hospital

At The Prince Charles Hospital, patients and their families are encouraged to take a trip down the newly completed ‘Memory Lane’. Read about the impactful project here.

Find out more

2023 Year in Review

The Common Good

2023 Year in Review

The Common Good’s 2023 Year in Review: It’s been an impactful year thanks to our phenomenal supporters! Click here to read all about it.

Find out more