The Common Good

Celebrating International Women's Day


International Women's Day, held on March 8, is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural, and political achievements of women.

The day also marks a call to action for accelerating women's equality. This year the theme is Break the Bias.

Whether deliberate or unconscious, bias makes it difficult for women to move ahead. This year, we encourage everyone to actively call out gender bias, discrimination and stereotyping every time you see it.

This International Women’s Day we wish to highlight some of the amazing women supporting The Prince Charles Hospital community, and working for the future of the common good.

Kesaia Rasova

Partnerships & Institutions Executive

What does International Women’s Day mean to you?

It means many things to me! International Women's Day Is a global day celebrating social, cultural, political, economical achievements of women, their journeys and everything that encompasses. It is also a platform to raise and constantly build awareness, for many other women who came before us, who are presently breaking down barriers, and to all the generations of young women to come.

We have an obligation to constantly be working towards a better world for all women that’s inclusive, respectful to all walks and ages of diversity.

What’s the best advice you can give to women starting their career in philanthropy?

  1. Change can and does start with you.
  2. Keep at the core of your work the ‘WHY’ you wanted to work in philanthropy. Remembering the ‘why’ will keep everything in perspective when the challenges arrive, and when your capacity is being stretched.
  3. Have fun and enjoy the journey.

What’s been the biggest ‘pinch me’ moments of your career?

To be involved with implemented strategies, goal setting, sustainability discussions and then to see them in motion years on. It's that pause, exhale and embrace of the ' this is why we do, what we have to do for others ' moment.

What woman has positively impacted your career? What’s one lesson she taught you?

I’ve had the privilege of learning from some of the most incredible women in my career. As a young woman in philanthropy, I was constantly nurtured and supported in learning how to balance all the commitments that come with life. If it had to be one, I would say a past CEO of mine, Adrienne Greene. I learnt from her how to continually grow, focus, learn and build bridges when there aren’t any in place. Her ability to get the job done and to stay so humble and relational, yet disciplinary when needed, has, and will continue to always be an aspiration of mine.

How can women in senior positions encourage more women to consider a career in philanthropy?

Philanthropy needs more women from various industries because there is something they can bring to the table with their experience, relations, and skill set. The sector needs more like-minded women, who will break down barriers and help continue to raise awareness to all these causes. Your abilities can help grow and better processes and operations, that can change this industry.

How do you define success?

Simple - it's the legacy you leave behind. I measure my success in – ‘have I given or invested enough in the next generation to make this world a better place for those to come?' Did I achieve my full potential and am I satisfied I have given everything I could to something greater than myself?
Success in giving and in Philanthropy is growing your market, relations, resources and reach. There is always room to learn, grow and adapt – choosing to be apart of something greater than yourself is the greatest success anyone can aspire to.

Jiville Latu

Clinical Nurse Research

As a woman in science and research what led you to work in this field?

It began with an interest of “why do we do what we do” which developed into “how do we know we are right”.

Would do you love most about being involved in science and research?

The collaborative effort – no single person can do anything without a team, each discipline is just as valuable as the next in project success.

In your opinion, what has been the greatest scientific development?

Antibiotics!

Jodie Armstrong

Enrolled Nurse, Thoracic Ward

What does International Women’s Day mean to you?

International Women's Day is a day of solidarity for us all to celebrate the great achievements and the accomplishments of women and to reflect on the positive changes that have happened to create equality. It’s about celebrating the power of women.

What’s the best advice you can give to women starting their career in health/nursing?

Always be bold and brave, nursing is a challenging and rewarding career, never underestimate your ability and always embrace every day and moment.

What’s been the biggest ‘pinch me’ moments of your career?

Every time I listen and connect with my patients and help them achieve “their impossible,” these are the most rewarding and priceless moments to me.

What woman has positively impacted you in your career and/or your life in general? What’s one lesson she taught you?

I would have to say my mum. She has taught me the valuable lesson of how not only you can be a mum, but you can have a career. Anything is possible when women support each other!

How do you define success?

Every day I come home to my family proud of what I have achieved throughout my day knowing I have cared and helped another person who was in need. Success is being proud of myself.

Toni Hammond

Research Program Support Officer

As a woman in science and research what led you to work in this field?

I've always wanted to work in the health industry to be able to help people. I quickly learnt the importance of research and how it can improve the health for the masses. I continued studying Clinical Epidemiology and tried to learn as much about COVID-19 as possible when the pandemic started. This eventually led to me working with the Critical Care Research Group’s COVID-19 Critical Care Consortium.

Would do you love most about being involved in science/research?
I love that the work we do helps large populations. I also get to learn something new every day and meet people from around the world, albeit virtually at the moment!

In your opinion, what has been the greatest scientific development?

Definitely the internet! The internet gives us so many tools in research, we can share knowledge and data so quickly, and meet people virtually whom we may not have the chance to meet otherwise.

What woman inspires you in the world of science and research?
I really do look up to Florence Nightingale - she made incredible discoveries in public health and the practices we still use today. 

Hannah Marrinan

Critical Care Research Group Manager

As a woman in science and research what led you to work in this field?

My study and subsequently undertaking a small research project overseas allowed me to appreciate how impactful research can be not just for individuals but whole communities.

While I don’t consider myself a researcher, I find my role as manager of a research group incredibly rewarding. My responsibility is to ease the burden of establishing and administering projects, allowing those within our group to focus their time where it matters most.

What do you love most about being involved in science and research?

I have the pleasure of working with an amazing group of people that dedicate their lives to finding ways to improve patient care and outcomes. I’ve witnessed members of our team translate their research into lifesaving procedures and without pomp, come back the next day to find ways to not only replicate but enhance their work.

Erin Dunn

Pharmacist Team Leader, Internal Medicine Service

What does International Women’s Day mean to you?

The opportunity to celebrate how far we have come in terms of equality in the workplace and in society in general, whilst also identifying and discussing opportunities for further progress.

What’s the best advice you can give to women starting their career in pharmacy/health?

Don’t give up! Health is challenging and sometimes you will feel helpless and overwhelmed, but never underestimate the value you can add to a patient’s journey.

What’s been the biggest ‘pinch me’ moment of your career?

I am a conference junkie so I would have to say some of the biggest highlights for me have been presenting quality improvement work at national and international conferences. Nothing gets the blood pumping like discussing your research on stage in front of hundreds of people!

What woman has positively impacted your career? What’s one lesson she taught you?

I have learnt bucketloads from my work wife (she will know who she is!) who has taught me a million lessons but most importantly, to take care of myself, so that I can be at my best.

How can women in senior positions encourage more women to consider a career in pharmacy/health?

It is always great to see both women and men in senior positions advocate for equal access to parental leave, access to affordable and high quality childcare, along with many other barriers that women have traditionally faced in the workplace. 

How do you define success?

I define success as making a positive impact by improving clinical outcomes for consumers, fostering ongoing service improvement, and bringing joy into the workplace. 

Suzie Cannon

Administration Manager - Medicine, Emergency & Children's Services

What does International Women’s Day mean to you?

I am lucky to work in a country and a profession that recognises the contribution of women.  However, others are not so fortunate.  The work to remove gender bias and celebrate the contribution of women can only enhance our workplaces and communities.


What’s the best advice you can give to women starting their career in admin/health?

Come in with a strong work ethic, a desire to learn and a passion for working with people and you will thrive both personally and professionally.


What woman has positively impacted you in your life/career? What’s one lesson she taught you?
I had a fabulous teacher during my secondary education at St Rita’s College - Mrs Townsley. She was extremely articulate, firm but fair and challenged me to produce the best work that I could.  She taught me that loving what you do for work is an absolute gift and that hard work and passion pays off.


How do you define success?

Success is spending my career doing work that I love and contributing positively to the teams I work with. 

Jo Hill

Consumer Liaison Manager

What does International Women’s Day mean to you?

Celebrating all women across the country who have achieved greatness in all aspects of life.

What’s the best advice you can give to women starting their career in health/admin?

Don’t be afraid to speak up and provide input into discussions as this could lead to great change.

What’s been one of your most memorable moments in your career?

Undertaking my first patient meeting when starting my role. It opened my eyes to how effectively we communicate with our patients as to what their experience is, and the impact that this can have on our patients and their relatives.

What woman has positively impacted you in your career?

There are women leaders all over the world who provide different levels of inspiration. I admire the strength and resilience of women who pursue high power careers understanding that they have to work hard to gain the trust and respect of their colleagues.

How do you define success?

Success is feeling as though you have done your job well and made a difference.

The Common Good would like to thank all of our featured researchers, administration officers and clinical staff for their contributions to this article.

Published: Tuesday, March 8 2022


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